Archive for the ‘Art’ Category


threadworlds-02 EW

Best known for his co-creation of Avatar: The Last Airbender and The Legend of Korra with Michael Dante DiMartino, Bryan Konietzko will be bringing us a new and original graphic novel entitled Threadworlds.

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stuff:legend

In childhood, bedtime can be the worst. Before sleep, enduring the darkness. Alone. What might be lurking under the bed? Or behind the closet door, slightly ajar? The Stuff of Legend, written by Mike Raicht and Brian Smith explores this fantastical territory. Its brave readers can venture into the darkness, to the furthest reaches of the imagination, a scary place, but also magical.

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chast

Old people can be so funny. Unabashed owners of their eccentricities and idiosyncrasies, they really seem to be on to something – enjoying life. Golden years, indeed. But eventually, it all becomes a bit less fun. The body, the mind, or maybe both, grow tired. Death becomes imminent. In these twilight years, folks need help. In her memoir, Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?, New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast chronicles her parents’ decline into poorer and poorer health.

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photo courtesy of Top Shelf Productions

photo courtesy of Top Shelf Productions

You know they say that each snowflake is completely unique, no two the same? Every life, all of fate’s permutations considered, would be too, wouldn’t it? Yet we seem to reject, suppress, and fear exceptionality, in ourselves and in others. It’s easier to blend. There’s safety in anonymity

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ARCHAIA_Storyteller_Witches_004

The fourth and final tale in Archaia’s Jim Henson’s The Storyteller: Witches miniseries is Jeff Stokely’s Vasilissa the Beautiful. Born into a village at the edge of the world, a village forgotten by god, our heroine is a little beacon of light and warmth. Until her mother dies. “Such cruelty,” our narrator muses, “makes you wonder where it comes from.”

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Howl!

Posted: December 17, 2014 by Kristilyn Waite in Art
Tags: , , , , , , ,

howl

How would you illustrate Howl? Allen Ginsberg’s legendary 1956 poetic ode to humanity, seminal in content and controversy, is written so excitably, teeming with vivid imagery, so simultaneously horrific and beautiful… where would you begin? Ginsberg enlisted Eric Drooker, a New York City street artist whose work he had been collecting for over a decade. Kindred in proletariat spirit, and experience, the two would collaborate on various projects. For Illuminated Poems, Drooker illustrated a collection of Ginsberg’s writings, including Howl. Howl: A Graphic Novel, published in 2010 by Harper Perennial, features another take on that endeavor, Drooker’s animation art created for the 2010 motion picture.

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AcmeNoveltyLibrary

If Chris Ware, as an entity, had to be represented as a symbol, it would have to be a funny bone, wouldn’t it? Sure, design-wise, there would be some problems to solve in that endeavor. And yes, the “funny” sensation is actually the ulnar nerve. But think about it. A laugh from Chris Ware does not come without a little pain. His work is not for everyone. It takes a bit of resignation – acceptance of human suffering, imperfection and, sometimes, ridiculousness. The Acme Novelty Library, published by Random House in 2005, serves as a compendium of his work. Cartoons, some seriously mini comics, and faux adverts, old and new, in a variety of styles and formats, are held together by a biting, sometimes nihilistic wit and charm.

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